Flag burners and protesters clash at Ft. Greene Park in Brooklyn

Photos: Francisco Collazo
[Please do not use these photos without permission. To purchase rights, contact Francisco Collazo: fracollaz[at]gmail[dot]com
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Yesterday, flag burners and people protesting their actions confronted each other at Ft. Greene Park in Brooklyn. You can read more about the confrontation in this article at DNAInfo.com. The photos below were taken by Francisco Collazo and are used with his permission.

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Protesters showed up in clothing bearing images of the American flag. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Protesters showed up in clothing bearing images of the American flag. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)

"Pro-America" protesters, as they dubbed themselves, included bikers and service members. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
“Pro-America” protesters, as they dubbed themselves, included bikers and service members. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)

As is often the case, this protest attracted attendees supporting numerous other causes and opinions. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
As is often the case, this protest attracted attendees supporting numerous other causes and opinions. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Bikers from a club called Hallowed Sons were on the scene. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Bikers from a club called Hallowed Sons were on the scene. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
As the ardent protesters clashed, others moved to the site. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
As the ardent protesters clashed, others moved to the site. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Flag burners had a small barbecue grill they used to light one flag on fire. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Flag burners had a small barbecue grill they used to light one flag on fire. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
One man brought a supersized water gun to douse any fires. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
One man brought a supersized water gun to douse any fires. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Protesters celebrated the disruption of the flag burning. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Protesters celebrated the disruption of the flag burning. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Police stood by, some with video cameras. DNAinfo reported that no arrests were made. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
Police stood by, some with video cameras. DNAinfo reported that no arrests were made. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
A participant holds a large American flag. Note new World Trade Center building in background. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)
A participant holds a large American flag. Note new World Trade Center building in background. (Photo: Francisco Collazo)

Mexicans in NYC Protest Election Outcome

Text: Julie Schwietert Collazo
Photos: Francisco Collazo
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New York City’s Union Square is often host to protests; it’s in a central location, and with high traffic and high visibility, protesters believe their cause will gain greater traction.

This weekend, a small but vocal group of Mexican Americans gathered on the southern side of Union Square to protest the July presidential election, in which Enrique Pena Nieto was victorious. Pena Nieto is a member of the PRI, the political party which ruled for 70 years, and his win was contested by the opposition, who claimed electoral fraud.

Mexico’s Federal Election Tribunal investigated the opposition’s claim, but on August 31, it ruled that Pena Nieto was the legitimate winner of the election. Mexicans in Mexico and the US took to the streets to express their discontent. Here are photos of the New York City protest:

A small group of Mexican Americans protested in Union Square.
A small group of Mexican Americans protested in Union Square.
"EPN" are the initials of the incoming president. The sign reads "EPN Delinquent: You're not my president. Wake up, Mexico."
“EPN” are the initials of the incoming president. The sign reads “EPN Delinquent: You’re not my president. Wake up, Mexico.”
Protesters called out vote buying and other electoral frauds.
Protesters called out vote buying and other electoral frauds.
The allusion of the pig mask isn't hard to decipher.
The allusion of the pig mask isn’t hard to decipher.
The man in the background is wearing a Mexican lucha libre (wrestling) mask.
The man in the background is wearing a Mexican lucha libre (wrestling) mask.

Mexico City by Metro: Zocalo

Today, in honor of Mexico’s Independence Day, our Mexico City by Metro series takes us to the Zocalo stop, which leaves you smack dab in the heart of Mexico City’s largest and most important plaza.

It’s a place where patriotism manifests itself in all its forms: pledges to the flag and protests against injustice. Here are a few of our favorite images from our visits to the Zocalo over the past week:

Mexico City Protest: 400 Pueblos Demand “Respuesta”

Last year, shortly after moving to Mexico City, I began exploring my new city and came across quite a sight: hundreds of men protesting in the nude on Avenida Reforma, the avenue that cuts through the heart of the capital.

After learning more about the protest, conducting research, and interviewing some of the men, I wrote an article about the 400 Pueblos movement. Ever since, I’ve been an interested observer of the frequent protests that erupt periodically around the city, and I’ve begun working on a project called “Bajo Protesta” (“Under Protest”), a multimedia journalistic piece about Latin American social justice movements.

Last week, I happened to be walking home when I stumbled into the midst of a 400 Pueblos protest. The slideshow below is a collage of photos I took of the men–and, now, women–demanding a response from the government regarding allegations of political and social injustice committed against indigenous, poor, and rural Mexicans. (Note: The slideshow does contain nudity).

“Esta es una de las diez millones de pequenas humillaciones que sufrimos a diario todos los mexicanos. Sabemos que todos tenemos los mismos derechos, pero muchas veces no estamos en condiciones de exigir que se nos respeten.” * “This is one of the 10 million little humiliations that all Mexicans suffer every day. We know that we all have the same rights, but often we’re not in the conditions to demand that we be respected.”
-Jorge Ibarguengoitia, from Instrucciones para Vivir en Mexico